The Eight Seven Summits


The eight seven summits, a group of eight mountains that span across the globe, challenging thousands of individuals each year. Each mountain marking the highest point on each of the worlds continents. From Mount Kilimanjaro and its 5 different vegetation zones in Africa, Mount Kosciuszko a relatively easy day hike in Australia, Denali pulling heavy sleds across vast snow capped glaciers in North America to Mount Everest the highest mountain in the world in Asia. All eight of the seven summits brings its own challenges, stunning views and individuality and summiting all seven is a huge achievement.

First achieved by American businessman Richard Bass on April the 30th 1985. Bass proved that reaching the highest point on each of the seven continents is a mountaineering challenge that can be completed by anyone. It wasn’t just limited to highly skilled mountaineers, but anyone with the right amount of fitness, determination, money and willingness to learn can build the skills to complete all seven. As a result the concept has brought hundreds of people from across the globe to the mountaineering world, helping to promote and grow the industry. So what mountains actually make up the seven summits? And why are their eight seven summits?


MOUNT EVEREST

Continent: Asia

Height: 8,848m

Location: Border of Solukhumbu District, Nepal & Tibet, China

Mountain Range: Himalayas

Cost to climb: US $45,000-$100,000+

Difficulty (Standard Guided Route):

Altitude: Extreme

Technical: Moderate – Hard

Physical: Extreme

Self Sufficiency: Hard

Weather Conditions: Hard

Estimated Average Deaths Per Year: Average 7 deaths per year

Peak climbing season: April-May

First Accent: 29th of May 1953, Edmund Hillary & Tenzing Norgay

Average Duration of expedition: 60 days


ACONCAGUA

Continent: South America

Height: 6,961m

Location: Mendoza, Argentina

Mountain Range: Andes

Cost to climb: US $4000-$8000

Difficulty (Standard Guided Route):

Altitude: Hard

Technical: Easy – Moderate

Physical: Moderate – Hard

Self Sufficiency: Moderate

Weather Conditions: Moderate – Hard

Estimated Average Deaths Per Year: Average 3 deaths per year

Peak climbing season: December – January

First Accent: 14th of January 1897, Matthias Zurbriggen

Average Duration of expedition: 20 days


DENALI

Continent: North America

Height: 6,194m

Location: Denali National Park, Alaska

Mountain Range: Alaska Range

Cost to climb: US $10,000 – $20,000

Difficulty:

Altitude: Moderate – Hard

Technical: Moderate

Physical: Hard – Extreme

Self Sufficiency: Hard – Extreme

Weather Conditions: Hard – Extreme

Estimated Average Deaths Per Year: Average 1 deaths per year

Peak climbing season: May – July

First Accent: June 7th 1913, Hudson Stuck, Harry Karstens, Waiter Harper, Robert Tatum

Average Duration of expedition: 20 days


MOUNT KILIMANJARO

Continent: Africa

Height: 5,895m

Location: Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania

Mountain Range: The Eastern Rift Mountains

Cost to climb: US $2,500 – $6,000

Difficulty:

Altitude: Moderate

Technical: Easy

Physical: Moderate

Self Sufficiency: Easy

Weather Conditions: Easy – Moderate

Estimated Average Deaths Per Year: Average 7 deaths per year

Peak climbing season: June – August & January – March

First Accent: 6 October 1889, Hans Meyer & Ludwig Purtschellar

Average Duration of expedition: 6 days


MOUNT ELBRUS

Continent: Europe

Height: 5,642m

Location: Elbrus and Upper Baksan Valley, Russia

Mountain Range: Caucasus Mountain Ranges

Cost to climb: US $2,500 – $6,000

Difficulty:

Altitude: Moderate

Technical: Easy – Moderate

Physical: Moderate

Self Sufficiency: Easy – Moderate

Weather Conditions: Moderate

Estimated Average Deaths Per Year: Average 20 deaths per year

Peak climbing season: June – August

First Accent: 1874, Florence Crauford Grove, Frederick Gardner, Horace Walker, Peter Knubel, and Ahiya Sottaiev 

Average Duration of expedition: 6 days


VINSON MASSIF

Continent: Antarctica

Height: 4,892m

Location: Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica

Mountain Range: Sentinel Range

Cost to climb: US $40,000 – $50,000

Difficulty:

Altitude: Easy – Moderate

Technical: Easy – Moderate

Physical: Moderate – Hard

Self Sufficiency: Moderate

Weather Conditions: Extreme

Estimated Average Deaths Per Year: Average 0 deaths per year

Peak climbing season: December – January

First Accent: 1966, Nicholas Clinch & party

Average Duration of expedition: 15 days


CARSTENSZ PYRAMID (PUNCAK JAYA)

Continent: Australasia

Height: 4,884m

Location: Papua Province, Indonesia

Mountain Range: Sudirman Range

Cost to climb: US $20,000 – $30,000

Difficulty:

Altitude: Easy – Moderate

Technical: Hard

Physical: Moderate – Hard

Self Sufficiency: Easy

Weather Conditions: Moderate – Hard

Estimated Average Deaths Per Year: Unknown

Peak climbing season: Year Round

First Accent: 1962, Heinrich Harrer, Philip Temple, Russell Kippax and Albertus Huizenga

Average Duration of expedition: 10 days


MOUNT KOSCIUSZKO

Continent: Australia

Height: 2,228m

Location: Snowy Mountains, Australia

Mountain Range: Main Range (Snowy Mountains)

Cost to climb: Free

Difficulty:

Altitude: Easy

Technical: Easy

Physical: Easy

Self Sufficiency: Easy

Weather Conditions: Easy

Estimated Average Deaths Per Year: Average 0 deaths per year

Peak climbing season: Year Round

First Accent: 15th of February 1840, Sir Paweł Edmund Strzelecki

Average Duration of expedition: 1 day

THE EIGHT SEVEN SUMMITS?

You may have noticed that we’ve called it the eight seven summits, why’s that? Because theres a debate between mountaineers whether Australia or Australasia should be considered the seventh continent. Geographically Australia is its own continent and therefore should be the seventh continent, making Mount Kosciusko the seventh summit. However famous mountaineer Reinhold Messner proposes that Carstensz Pyramid located in Indonesia should replace Australia’s Mount Kosciusko and the seventh continent should be Australasia rather than just Australia. Therefore kicking Australia’s Mount Kosciusko (2,228m) off the list being replaced by Indonesia’s Carstensz Pyramid (4,884m). Messner pushed this heavily because Carstensz Pyramid is significantly more difficult and is an expedition in nature whereas Mount Kosciusko is a simple day hike.

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